GRAMMAR FOR DUMMIES

Different use of Bien & Bon

 

As previously explained in a different Grammar For Dummies, « bon » & « bien » are grammatically different :

« Bon » is an adjective (so it gives information about a noun and it can change : bon / bonne / bons / bonnes) and is the opposite of « mauvais » (that also changes : mauvais / mauvaise/ mauvaises).

« Bien » is an adverb (it gives information about verbs, and as verbs don‘t have a gender its spelling never changes) and its opposite is « mal » (again never changes its spelling).

 

Different use of « bien » :

 

  • To emphazise :

« Bien » in spoken French is often used as a replacement of « très » to emphasize :

Examples :

Je suis bien contente = je suis très/super contente.

C’était bien bon ! = c’était très / super bon.

Ce week end, c’était bien cool on a fait ….. = … c’était très /super cool

C’est bien dommage que … = C’est très / super dommage

Il fait bien froid en ce moment = il fait très froid en ce moment.

 

  • To ask for a confirmation (you are not sure you have the correct information so you want to double check):

Examples :

In a shop : C’est ….€, c’est bien ça ?

On the phone : Je suis bien chez Madame Brown ?

 

Different use of « bon » :

 

  • To express a surprise : Ah bon ?? = Vraiment ??

Examples :

Ah bon ?? La piscine est fermée en inter saison ?

Ah bon ?? Il va neiger demain ?

 

  • To ask for a validation or to validate something : c’est bon ? / c’est bon !

Examples :

C’est toujours bon, je passe te prendre demain à 14h ? = ask for a validation

Est ce qu’on se voit la semaine prochaine ? Oui c’est bon pour moi ! = a validation

On fait des crêpes ? Oui c’est bon j’ai tout ce qu’il faut. = a validation